Vigeland Park. Named after Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland, Vigeland Park holds more than 200 human-figure sculptures, all product of said artist. Taking a walk here is sure to leave you impressed, awed even but also slightly disturbed. Noticing the park’s design, the trail slowly and purposefully leads you to the main piece: the Monolith. The Monolith depicts a bunch of people piling one on top of another, apparently struggling to get to the top of the sculpture. Might it represent a stairway to heaven? Resurrection? Any thoughts?

Crying Boy
Norway exhibits a crisp, sophisticated beauty. The architecture is all straight lines, neatness and precision. And then, there’s Vigeland Park.

Let’s start with my coming to Norway’s great capital. I bought tickets to Oslo on a whim, just because I wanted to go somewhere. In Oslo, I met an Albanian whom I joined for a drink in a bar where the fire alarm went off a mere seconds after the third sip on my beer. I called it a night.

The next day, I got a map somehow – that sounded almost heroic. It was probably from the hotel reception. I checked out my options - Norway isn’t like London where every corner is a pub and in between each one of those you get to ride a Ferris Wheel, eat curry and climb up a cathedral. Not to say that it isn’t beautiful. Norway exhibits a crisp, sophisticated beauty. The architecture is all straight lines, neatness and precision. And then, there’s Vigeland Park.

Couple
Unlike roman sculptures with their simple poses and their fig leaves, these sculptures are frank, unashamed, striving with emotion and life.

The walk through Vigeland Park can almost be described as intimidating. Scratch that. The walk through Vigeland Park is absolutely intimidating. Human statues are everywhere. Unlike roman sculptures with their simple poses and their fig leaves, these sculptures are frank, unashamed, striving with emotion and life. On one side, a young child throwing a tantrum, a playful couple, excited children hands raised high. On the other, a father lifting up his son, a man hitting a boy, another standing arms crossed over chest. The statues are all in movement and all in the nude. To get to the Monolith, a gate of naked men must be crossed. It seems important to mention though again, any thoughts? Surrounding the granite tower are more sculptures – Vigeland’s inspiration was clearly endless. I stop to stare at one of young boys riding on a large-breasted woman’s back, her long braid acting as reign. Further, two girls are sitting on their heads, their legs joining above and somewhere else boys are fighting. And then again, the Monolith. Intertwined bodies struggling to reach what? The meaning is lost on me. So I stood there staring…

             

The Writer

I write stuff for fun, if it was for a living I would be homeless.

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Quotes

Bizarre travel plans are dancing lessons from God. Kurt Vonnegut